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Fun, Money and Snow!

Most snowboarders have considered it, a few of us have actually done it. Regardless, it’s a great idea.

A snowboarding working holiday.

Let’s face it, being a snowboarder is a constant drain on the pockets because you absolutely have to have the latest gear. By combining your passion for snowboarding with a little hard labour, you can have the best of all worlds and become a more experienced rider and better person.

We spoke to Susan Officer, Special Programs co-ordinator at CCUSA and asked her to give us the lowdown on a snowboarding working holiday in Canada.

What does CCUSA do? (in regards to the Canadian ski work program in particular)

CCUSA organizes jobs at top ski resorts in Canada. Together with our program partner, we bring the resorts to Australia to interview our participants and offer them jobs on the spot. They get their placements before they leave Australia so they are all set for when they get there.

What are the advantages of going with CCUSA, rather than organizing it yourself?

Benefits of going with CCUSA as opposed to doing it yourself are that we offer support all the way. We bring employers out to hire participants, which takes the headache out of trying to get one when you land in the country! We help you with applying for your visa and we do a pre-departure party. We have great local support before participants leave with agents who have been and done these types of programs, so have first hand experience!

What are the main mountains CCUSA put people at in Canada?
Big White, Whistler, Silverstar, Nakiska, Lake Louise and we also have a company called Crystal Holidays that do placements to the resorts already listed as well as Fernie and Tremblant.

How much money do you need before you go?
The visa states you need funds of around $3000 to be able to support yourself when you first get there and as we all know, resort towns are notoriously more expensive than anywhere else so the more you can save before you go, the better!

What sort of person is a working ski holiday in Canada suited to?
Anyone who enjoys the outdoors and is looking for an adventure. You certainly don’t have to be Ross Rebagliati; there are lots of jobs for everyone.  Unfortunately the visa only allows under 30’s to go, but the regulations have changed for this year which means that if you have already had a visa you can go again, and also the visa has been lengthened to 2 years! That is great new for everyone so if you loved the first winter, you can go back again the next year!

What sort of jobs are available?
Jobs range from hospitality – waiter, cashier, line cooks, to housekeeping, ski retail and rental, ski/snowboard school and Big White even does ski/snowboard instructor courses!

What are the average wages available? Does this allow for an enjoyable lifestyle?
The average wage runs between $5.50 to $14 depending on what you are doing. As long as you aren’t living like Paris Hilton, this should leave you enough money for a beer after work.

What sort of accommodation is the norm?
All our resorts offer our participants housing assistance. This can mean anything from staff housing which is around $250-$300/mth rent, which in a resort town is cheap cheap cheap, to live in chalet work which is factored in to your wage package! In most cases you will probably share an apartment/house that is near the mountain. This will include a communal living area and kitchen.

How much snowboarding can you do?
You will have 2 days off a week which you can do all the snowboarding you like in and as most mountains throw in a free mountain pass, this is extra good. Otherwise it depends on the job you are doing, you may be able to go out for a board on your breaks also.

THE nightlife?
Always pumping! I remember my winter in Whistler, all the pubs/bar would put on a theme night on a different night of the week, so there was always something happening somewhere. Everyone is there to work hard and have a great time.

Explain a typical day for someone on a CCUSA working holiday…
Work day – up early and off to work. Meet people work hard. Take a meal break and a run down the mountain. Finish work, socialize with work mates. Home to change, go out and have fun.

What are the three top reasons to take a working holiday to Canada?
•<!–[endif]–>Canada has such rare natural beauty right across the country.•Meet new friend and experience a new country•<!–[if !supportLists]–><!–[endif]–>Fantastic snow
Where can someone go for more information?
Jump online at www.ccusa.com
Most snowboarders have considered it, a few of us have actually done it. Regardless, it’s a great idea.

A snowboarding working holiday.

Let’s face it, being a snowboarder is a constant drain on the pockets because you absolutely have to have the latest gear. By combining your passion for snowboarding with a little hard labour, you can have the best of all worlds and become a more experienced rider and better person.

We spoke to Susan Officer, Special Programs co-ordinator at CCUSA and asked her to give us the lowdown on a snowboarding working holiday in Canada.

What does CCUSA do? (in regards to the Canadian ski work program in particular)
CCUSA organizes jobs at top ski resorts in Canada. Together with our program partner, we bring the resorts to Australia to interview our participants and offer them jobs on the spot. They get their placements before they leave Australia so they are all set for when they get there.

What are the advantages of going with CCUSA, rather than organizing it yourself?
Benefits of going with CCUSA as opposed to doing it yourself are that we offer support all the way. We bring employers out to hire participants, which takes the headache out of trying to get one when you land in the country! We help you with applying for your visa and we do a pre-departure party. We have great local support before participants leave with agents who have been and done these types of programs, so have first hand experience!

What are the main mountains CCUSA put people at in Canada?
Big White, Whistler, Silverstar, Nakiska, Lake Louise and we also have a company called Crystal Holidays that do placements to the resorts already listed as well as Fernie and Tremblant.

How much money do you need before you go?
The visa states you need funds of around $3000 to be able to support yourself when you first get there and as we all know, resort towns are notoriously more expensive than anywhere else so the more you can save before you go, the better!

What sort of person is a working ski holiday in Canada suited to?
Anyone who enjoys the outdoors and is looking for an adventure. You certainly don’t have to be Ross Rebagliati; there are lots of jobs for everyone.  Unfortunately the visa only allows under 30’s to go, but the regulations have changed for this year which means that if you have already had a visa you can go again, and also the visa has been lengthened to 2 years! That is great new for everyone so if you loved the first winter, you can go back again the next year!

What sort of jobs are available?
Jobs range from hospitality – waiter, cashier, line cooks, to housekeeping, ski retail and rental, ski/snowboard school and Big White even does ski/snowboard instructor courses!

What are the average wages available? Does this allow for an enjoyable lifestyle?
The average wage runs between $5.50 to $14 depending on what you are doing. As long as you aren’t living like Paris Hilton, this should leave you enough money for a beer after work.

What sort of accommodation is the norm?
All our resorts offer our participants housing assistance. This can mean anything from staff housing which is around $250-$300/mth rent, which in a resort town is cheap cheap cheap, to live in chalet work which is factored in to your wage package! In most cases you will probably share an apartment/house that is near the mountain. This will include a communal living area and kitchen.

How much snowboarding can you do?
You will have 2 days off a week which you can do all the snowboarding you like in and as most mountains throw in a free mountain pass, this is extra good. Otherwise it depends on the job you are doing, you may be able to go out for a board on your breaks also.

THE nightlife?


Always pumping! I remember my winter in Whistler, all the pubs/bar would put on a theme night on a different night of the week, so there was always something happening somewhere. Everyone is there to work hard and have a great time.

Explain a typical day for someone on a CCUSA working holiday…
Work day – up early and off to work. Meet people work hard. Take a meal break and a run down the mountain. Finish work, socialize with work mates. Home to change, go out and have fun.

What are the three top reasons to take a working holiday to Canada?

<!–[if !supportLists]–>Canada has such rare natural beauty right across the country.•<!–[if !supportLists]–><!–[endif]–>Meet new friend and experience a new country•<!–[if !supportLists]–><!–[endif]–>Fantastic snow
Where can someone go for more information?
Jump online at www.ccusa.com

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February 10th, 2010

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    A snowboarding job is really very difficult task because you need to care about the person who is getting help of yours in snowboarding.

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